The vital role of art in communicating climate change

Sociological theory indicates that movements for change only become successful once the idea has become so grounded that artists take up the message and run with it. At that point the issue will have arrived.

Oddly art and music have not had a great presence in communicating the climate message to date. Now a Melbourne group of musicians has taken this up with style. You can watch their 2 minute trailer below or click here. 

The artists’ main web link is at: http://www.simonkerrmusic.net
Click here for discussion on The Conversation.

Tasmania’s energy security

How much is the current energy emergency in Tasmania costing in money?
How much is it costing us in terms of greenhouse emissions?

Hydro storage levels
(Hydro Tasmania’s declining storage levels)

On March 31 Co-convenor of Climate Tasmania, Phil Harrington, delivered a presentation at the University of Tasmania with the aim of encouraging wider discussion on what Tasmania’s responses should be.

Phil’s presentation can be downloaded here.

Our Submission: Draft Climate Action Plan

Submission by Climate Tasmania
on the Tasmanian governments’s Draft Climate Action Plan
“Embracing the Challenge”

22 March 2016

Submission by Climate Tasmania
on the Tasmanian government’s Draft Climate Action Plan
(Embracing the Challenge).
22 March 2016


OVERVIEW


1.1 Introduction
Climate Tasmania welcomes the Tasmanian Government’s initiative to release the Draft Plan for public consideration. We especially welcome the extensive time made available ahead of the deadline for submissions. This is a very complex subject demanding a lot of thought and consultation.

Continue reading “Our Submission: Draft Climate Action Plan”

Snapshot of power generation in real time

A wonderful resources: By hovering your mouse over the live graphic below you can see how much energy is being used and from where it is being sourced.

The data displayed is updated at frequent intervals.

By hovering your mouse over the live graphic below you can see measured amounts of power generation by energy source.

The data displayed is updated at frequent intervals. The narrow purplish bar represents diesel generation.

State climate strategy: call for public feedback

“Embracing the Climate Challenge” has been finally released in late December.

There is an extended period in which make pubic submissions, so now is the time to do that. The deadline is March 25.

CoverThe Tasmanian government’s long awaited climate strategy “Embracing the Climate Challenge” has been finally released – unfortunately just one week before Christmas when hardly anyone was paying attention.

There is an extended period in which make pubic submissions, so now is the time to do that. The deadline is March 25. Please download the draft report by clicking on the above link.

In the meantime the apple cart has been upended somewhat as the state’s energy system has been plunged into emergency – Basslink being disabled and Hydro Tasmania’s water reserves being critically low.

Feedback is open until 25 March 2016 and can be forwarded to the Tasmanian Climate Change Office by:
Email: climatechange@dpac.tas.gov.au
Mail: Tasmanian Climate Change Office
GPO Box 123 HOBART TAS 7001

Let us help you write a submission

Here’s your invitation to our free forum where we will help to unpack the government’s Draft Climate Change Strategy.

Following Tasmania’s eventful Summer this is an opportune time for the government to be engaging the community.

Deadline for submissions: 25th March 2016.

Here’s your invitation our free forum where we will help to unpack the government’s Draft Climate Change Strategy.

Following Tasmania’s eventful Summer this is an opportune time for the government to be engaging the community. Deadline for submissions: 25th March

Flyer final 2

Massive open online course: It’s free!

Climate Change: a question of justice?

Justice

In the lead up to the all important Paris climate summit here’s your chance to engage on one of the most important issues of all for the world community.

This is a free open online course put on by Infernum and Lund University (Sweden). All you need is the enthusiasm to take part.

You can download the program here. It includes a link so you can register.

There’s even a video trailer!

Anyone interested should register as soon as possible. The course starts at the end of September.

Where do Tasmania’s carbon emissions come from?

Tasmania has already reached its long term emissions reductions target (60% below 1990 levels by 2050) way ahead of schedule!

On the face of it this totally unexpected success seems to be illogical and unbelievable, particularly because it can be argued that almost nothing significant has been done on the mitigation policy front to achieve that goal. So how did it come about? What is the story behind this story?

Tasmania has already reached its long term emissions reductions target – 60% below 1990 levels by 2050 – way ahead of schedule!

The chart shown below illustrates graphically the latest national carbon pollution inventory for Australia. As readers will see, Tasmania now appears to be virtually carbon neutral. Sequestration of carbon by the forest sector almost cancels out all of the carbon pollution that is caused by transport and all other sectors combined. So it appears.

Tas carbon emissions

On the face of it this totally unexpected success seems to be illogical and unbelievable, particularly because it can be argued that almost nothing significant has been done on the mitigation policy front to achieve that goal. So how did it come about? What is the story behind this story?

Climate Tasmania member Dr John Hunter provides an erudite explainer in this analysis.
(Hobart Mercury feature, September 1)

The national carbon pollution inventory data can be accessed via this link.

Facing up to climate change risks

Climate Tasmania held the third of its information forums on August 24. Here we looked into the major risks that Tasmania faces as the world’s climate heats up, and likely implications for Tasmanian society.

This forum focussed on three major risks that Tasmania is likely to face: 1) an increase in the incidence and severity of wildfires 2) an accelerating increase in sea level rise and 3) significant implications for human health. To explore these themes we invited expert speakers in each of these three areas to provide presentations.

Tasmania RiskClimate Tasmania held the third of its information forums on August 24. Here we looked into the major risks that Tasmania faces as the world’s climate heats up, and likely implications for Tasmanian society.

Our 1st forum had previously looked at some economic risks – for example to Hydro Tasmania’s energy output and for sea fisheries management. Our 2nd forum addressed likely implications that extreme temperatures, unseasonal weather and droughts may impose on agricultural production.

This 3rd forum, chaired by UTAS professor Jan McDonald, focussed on three other major risks that Tasmania is likely to face – an increase in the incidence and severity of wildfires, an accelerating increase in sea level rise and significant implications for human health. To explore these themes we invited expert speakers in each of these three areas to provide presentations.
Continue reading “Facing up to climate change risks”